The New Jersey online gambling industry is one of the most innovative in the United States. Regulators are constantly developing strategies to improve their bottom line of casinos and that is evident with three proposed rule changes that are schedule to be finalized sometime in early 2016.

Casinos could pay celebrities to play online under new rules

The Press of Atlantic City reported last week on the changes that will take place in 2016 and the one that’s received the most attention from the industry involves celebrity players. Online casinos would be allowed to pay celebrities to play peer-to-peer games like online poker as part of a promotional strategy.

The rule allows casinos different options for paying these players, including treating them like shills. A shill for a live casino is a player that isn’t paid an actual fee but the money they wager is provided to them by the casino. The player acting as a shill can then keep any profits if they walk away a winner.

A shill style relationship would probably be one employed for online poker pros sponsored by online casinos where we could see other celebrities commanding a fee. It is hard to see a member of the NJ Devils play on the site for a shill style deal.

The report didn’t specify what details casinos will need to share with the public regarding these deals. Odds are that they will have to notify players that celebrities are paid to play on the site.

Online gambling servers will not have to be located inside partner casino

Another rule proposed by the Division of Gaming Enforcement will give casinos some flexibility on where they host their servers. Presently, casinos are required to house their iGaming servers on-site.

Under the new provision, iGaming servers can be housed in another location but only under certain conditions. The property must be owned or leased by the licensee, inaccessible to the general public, secure and designed to house the server equipment.

Social games can be funded by online gambling accounts

The third rule that will go into effect in February involves funding social games with online gambling funds. Player will be allowed to use money from their online gambling accounts to play social online games, including card games and slots.

Of course, these games do not pay out any type of cash prize and are done for enjoyment and social interaction. Operators must provide a conspicuous notice that these games are not regulated by the DGE.

If this sounds like a silly rule, consider the fact that Billions have been spent in the last few years in social games on Facebook and other sites. Players like to play for enjoyment, so if they want to use their money for that cause, why not let them.

The three rules are presently in their public comment period where citizens can voice issues, concerns, etc. This period ends on February 6 and the DGE plans to write the rules to the state register after this period.

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